Who is Kansai Yamamoto (Dies at 76) Wiki, Bio, Age, Net Worth, Instagram, Twitter & More Facts

kansai yamamoto

Kansai Yamamoto Wiki – Kansai Yamamoto Biography

Kansai Yamamoto, Designer With Ziggy Stardust as a Client, Dies at 76, Japanese fashion designer Kansai Yamamoto, known for styling musician David Bowie, has died at the age of 76, his family said.

Kansai Yamamoto .Age

Kansai Yamamoto Died at the age-76-year

Kansai Yamamoto Biography / Wiki

Kansai Yamamoto was a Japanese fashion designer, most influential during the 1970s and 1980s. Wikipedia
Died: July 21, 2020 Trending
Born: February 8, 1944, Yokohama, Kanagawa, Japan
On view: Café de Oriente Museo del Traje, Röhsska Museet
Children: Mirai Yamamoto
Movies: The Blue Light, Abordage
Siblings: Yūsuke Iseya, Yoshihiko Yamamoto

Yamamoto designed the most famous clothes of Bowie, including the singer’s alter ego Ziggy Stardust.
Her daughter said on Monday that the designer was diagnosed with leukemia and died last Tuesday.
Yamamoto was known for incorporating colorful creations and traditional Japanese designs into fashion.
“In my eyes, my father was not only the eclectic and energetic spirit that the world knew him, but also thoughtful, kind and loving,” said daughter Yamamoto Mirai.

“He valued communication and shower me with love all my life,” he added.

Yamamoto’s work blended traditional Japanese designs, including some of the kabuki theater, with bright and bold fantastic colors.

Born in Yokohama in 1944, he intended to go to engineering, but returned to fashion design.
He was the first Japanese designer to be exhibited at London Fashion Week in 1971.

At that time, he was described by Harpers & Queen magazine as “The Show of the Year … a great coup theater.
After this show, Ziggy started working with Bowie, who designed his costumes for Stardust and Aladdin Sane tours.
“My clothes became part of David’s songs and music,” he told the Hollywood Reporter in 2016. Said. “They’ve become part of his message to the world. He even wanted to go a little more crazy.”

One of the most famous designs for the singer was a cape covered with Japanese kanji characters.

Kansai Yamamoto and his clothing

His clothes were also worn by Elton John, Stevie Wonder and John Lennon. More recently, singer Lady Gaga Yamamoto was pictured in his designs.

Yamamoto showed at fashion events in New York, Paris and London until 1992.

He also created “super shows” that combine fashion, music and dance – including India, Russia and Vietnam. According to the Kyodo News Agency, 120,000 people were watched at the 1993 show in Moscow Red Square.
Yamamoto had a “super energy” show scheduled for July 31. His team said this would continue.

In addition to fashion events, he designed venues and social events for the 2008 G8 summit in Tokyo. He also designed the skyliner train that connects Tokyo Narita Airport to the city and earns it more awards.

In his statement from his company, it was the slogan “People have unlimited energy”. Regardless of how hard things were, he never allowed him to continue the challenge after the struggle. ”

Yamamoto’s funeral took place, but his team said it might be a “farewell” in the future due to discussions about his close family and coronavirus outbreak.

Kansai Yamamoto Full Life story

The unapologetically, flamboyant fashion designer Kansai Yamamoto, the discovery of love of color, unlimited imagination, and gender-free dressing, attracted David Bowie’s attention and helped define the look of his alter ego Ziggy Stardust. He died in Japan on July 21. He was 76 years old.

What is the cause of the death of Kansai Yamamoto?

the cause of the death of Kansai Yamamoto reason was leukemia, a statement was confirmed on the official website.

Kansai Yamamoto Best Known For and his achievements

As Mr. Yamamoto is generally known, Kansai was not as well known as some of the higher-profile Japanese fashion contemporaries, including Rei Kawakubo from Yohji Yamamoto, Issey Miyake, and Comme des Garçons. However, it was Kansaiwho that a number of Japanese design talents left their mark on the Western industry.

He was among the first Japanese designers to be exhibited in London in 1971 – exactly ten years before Ms. Kawakubo and the other Mr. Yamamoto. The signature aesthetics of sculptural shapes, conflicting textures and prints, and dazzling color combinations attracted the industry’s attention.

Kansai’s first collection splashed on the cover of the magazine Harpers & Queen with the slogan “Explosion from Tokyo”, and its growing profile led to collaboration with eleven John and Stevie Wonder, as well as ten Bowtons, including decades Elton John and Stevie Wonder. he established a long-standing creative relationship with him.
“The color is like the oxygen we both breathe in the same area,” Kansai said to work with Mr. Bowie, who once died in 2016.

Kansai Yamamoto Education

He studied civil engineering before leaving school to study English at Nippon University in 1962. A self-taught fashion designer (although fashion later says “fashion is not a profession I will recommend”) founded the Yamamoto Kansai Company in the 28th year of the first London show.

Kansai Yamamoto Start of brightfull career

After the bright period in the 1970s and 80s, and after Japanese fashion had a global significance for developing minimalistic minimalism, Kansai continued to discover its interest in traditional Japanese clothing and craftsmanship, but it developed in a different and fantastic way.

He often drew attention to the concept of the Japanese success, his love for color and showing off his long-standing affinity; A person who is the opposite of the wabi-sabi idea, a Buddhist idea where beauty is ideal in imperfect, humble and humble materials.

Beginning in Red Square in Moscow in 1993, he always started to make exaggerated “super shows”, including someone with a huge inflatable whale.

About the author

Daniel Chapman

Originally from the U.K., Darryl Hinton is a journalist and web content specialist who now lives and writes in Trending Topics of the United States, United Kingdom, and Australia. Chapman’s work has appeared in a wide range of publications in print and online, including The Guardian, The Daily Beast, Pacific Standard magazine, The Independent, McSweeney’s Internet Tendency, and many other outlets.

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