Who is Brandon Caserta (anti-government Video) Wiki, Biography, Age, Video on Twitter, Unknown FACTS YOU NEED TO KNOW

Brandon Caserta

Brandon Caserta Wiki – Brandon Caserta Biography

Video circulating on social media appears to show Brandon Caserta expressing his anti-government — and anti-Trump

Brandon Caserta Viral Video

Brandon Caserta Video on Social media

Video circulating on social media appears to show Brandon Caserta expressing his anti-government — and anti-Trump — views.

“Trump is not your friend, dude,” Caserta says, with an anarchist flag hanging behind him. “It amazes me that people actually, like, believe that when he’s shown over and over and over again that he’s a tyrant. Every single person that works for government is your enemy, dude.”

He also ranted about “getting robbed by government thugs for some made-up traffic violation” after receiving a traffic ticket.

Caserta’s alleged views surface amid Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden and Whitmer both blaming Trump for inspiring the sick scheme, as they claim he failed to denounce white supremacy and extremism in the US.

Caserta was among 13 men busted by the feds Thursday who planned to kidnap Whitmer and storm the Capitol building in Michigan in hopes of sparking a civil war. Seven of the defendants were linked to a militia group called the Wolverine Watchmen.

There is a YouTube video of a suspect, Brandon Caserta, pretending to fire a gun while wearing a sleeveless shirt using obscene to explain to “THE GOVERNMENT” what he wanted to do. Hawaiian shirts – common symbols of the fiercely anti-government Boogaloo movement, appearing in the cupboard behind him. In a TikTok video, Caserta is shown in a shirt like this.

Brandon Caserta on twitter

 

He apparently has a Twitter account owned by another suspect, Barry Croft, shouting about immigrants, praising President Trump, and demanding that Trump’s once Democratic rival, Hillary Clinton, be put on trial. A photograph in the account shows a young man wrapped in ammunition and carrying a rifle. Croft also seems to have an account on a small social media site dedicated to spreading right-wing conspiracy theory QAnon.

And then, until it was removed in recent weeks, there was a Facebook page called “Michigan Militia Corps, Wolverines” using similar phrases to the group behind the conspiracy, which the authorities described as the “Wolverine Watchmen”. In a May post, there is a picture accompanied by men holding large firearms, linking to an article titled “Trump sided with protesters against the governor of Michigan.

Wolverine Watchmen, extremist group involved in Michigan kidnapping plan, trained for “civil war”

“Social media companies are allowing these communities to form and grow by ignoring the growing evidence that memes, posts, and images that promote violence are turning into real violence,” said Cindy Otis, a former CIA analyst and vice president of analysis. discovered. “Many of these Michigan pages and groups have not only been on Facebook for years, the Facebook algorithm has actively encouraged other militia-related groups and pages to join, allowing each page and group to expand their reach.”

In June, Facebook removed hundreds of Boogaloo accounts and groups, including Wolverine Watchmen, after signs of violent online rhetoric spreading into the real world. The company said on Thursday: “We remove content, deactivate accounts, and promptly notify law enforcement when there is an imminent threat of harm to people or public safety. Earlier in this ongoing investigation, we proactively contacted and cooperated with the FBI.”

While it is impossible to know exactly what role social media plays in promoting criminal intent, violent extremism is accompanied by substantial evidence of online activity as revealed in court documents after the arrests and assembled by independent investigators.

When a security guard was shot dead in May outside the federal court building in Oakland, California, investigators quickly contacted the accused murderer, Air Force Sgt. Steven Carrillo to the Boogaloo movement, which spread widely on Facebook and other social media, before the sites crashed on them.

As Trump warns of left-wing violence, a dangerous threat emerges from the right-wing boogaloo movement

Carrillo shared his desire to rekindle the protests that took place near Oakland courthouse before he ambushed the security guard, according to court documents. Use their anger to fuel our fire. Take off your horse glasses. We have gangs of angry people to use to our advantage. “He scribbled the word” Boog “with blood on a car he stole in a separate incident that resulted in the murder of a deputy sheriff.

In June, federal officials accused three Boogaloo affiliates of planning to use Molotov cocktails and other explosives to trigger a violent backlash among protesters gathering in Las Vegas. The documents said they were part of the Nevada Boogaloo group on Facebook.

In the 15-page FBI statement on the Michigan plan released on Thursday, there are three references to a private Facebook group and 11 references to encrypted communication apps. Independent investigators soon found the arrested people active on Twitter, TikTok, Facebook and YouTube.

A second criminal complaint filed by the Michigan State Police said Joseph Morrison, one of the arrested, was the commander of Wolverine Watchman. However, it had another name on the internet called Boogaloo Bunyan, which refers to the violent anti-government movement that emerged during the anti-government protests that erupted in many state capitals and other cities in the spring.

While most online extremes come with at least a pinch of irony or humor, sometimes presented in visual memes, it can have the effect of gradually presenting radical ideas to people who are new to online.

The irony disappears after prolonged exposure to ironic violence. Researching online extremism and

 

About the author

Daniel Chapman

Originally from the U.K., Darryl Hinton is a journalist and web content specialist who now lives and writes in Trending Topics of the United States, United Kingdom, and Australia. Chapman’s work has appeared in a wide range of publications in print and online, including The Guardian, The Daily Beast, Pacific Standard magazine, The Independent, McSweeney’s Internet Tendency, and many other outlets.

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